Category Archives: Pathallea

Pathallea: The Basics of Thoul, part 4.

Other, “radical” forms:

Of (to/from) = eg(-)      /comparative adjective/ = -ner-    /superlative…/ = -ser-       /inverted comparative (lesser)/ = -nor-     /superlative… (least)/ = -sor-

However = dedek      Ago = de      Ado = ghe    That = deck     Such = dock

Behold = dack      Lo = duck      Alas = dyck      (a) Lot = mer      Re- = si-

(to) Make = sei      /past/ = hoi      /present/ = hio      /future/ = hei

Rather = gwarr      Rather than = gwarreck      Meanwhile/while = gheck/ghock

Some…:  something = omkiff, somebody = omsharr, sometime = omyarr.

*copula-like normal verbs*

To give = yillei, to take = yellei, to bring = illei, to buy = ellei, to begin = yilklei, to finish = yelklei.

Sentence Formation:

Simple sentence (Indicative form):  I ran home = laeo lik larua, or, laeoes larua.

Complex sentence:  I ran home because of (the) monsterslaeoes larua gegek (kif) rygarkia.

Compound sentence:  I ran home because I was scaredlaeoes larua gegek rygeues.

Compound-complex sentence:  I ran home because I was scared of the monsterslaeoes larua gegek rygeues egrygarkia.

Interrogative (question) form #1:  I did run home. >> Did I run home? = kloilaees larua. >> kloilaeesai larua?

Interrogative form #2 (for interrog./relative particles):  What to do…. >> What to do…? = sar ioklei…. >> sara ioklei?

Imperative forms (commands/interjections):  You there!  Hey!  What?! >> oray lirr!  hay!  sare?!

Linking verbs:  I do go, I can go, I did go, I could go, I don’t go, I can’t go >> kleileies, leiklioes, kleioleies, leikloies, ikleileies, leiiklioes.  I will be going, I would be going, I can be gone, I can’t be gone >> leiosesei, leiosesea, egleiesklioes, eghleiesklioes.

Sample Sentence(s):

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Nees abreykariya freiorya niks dreiorya il freiokiah niks dreiokiaa.  Nekaneesekio pha hydieria niks hykieria niks vaeylia yil eya orraya il phurra egkarnyadra.  (Dallia eya eg kof Mordeanilorrendriya Breykaridreiokiya)

War is peace.  Freedom is slavery.  Ignorance is strength.

Rickea ryckeio.  Froioudra freioudrio.  Kathida gathidio.

**this concludes part 4!**

 

Work of the Week #24

Ancient relics of Breykaria:

Minkathnaazrah’s helmet:  Most prized war-helmet in Breykaria, given that it once belonged to King Minkathnaazrah himself.

Minkathnaazrah helmet

The Warrior plaque:  Etched, gold plaque containing the poem “Warrior.”  It now resides at the Aealian museum of Ancient Relics (founded by the Professor), alongside the above helmet.

Azuephoydah:  Breykaria’s largest and oldest lighthouse.  Built by an ancient clan of Yoleukara, it comes with its own shield and a fibre-optic cable linking it to an equally sophisticated communications base.

So long as my light guides you You shall return home

Triickulea:  A siege weapon resembling a trebuchet, made from hardwood with Yoleukaran writing along its main beams.  It is another relic of the long-lost tribe that once inhabited Agrobask.

The Great Chain:  Built in Minkathnaazrah’s time, it spans considerable swaths of barrier reef along the southern and eastern reaches of Orimar.  Made from massive chain-links of solid iron, this defensive measure can be raised up from the water to restrict the movement of ships and even low-hovering craft.

 

Pathallea: The Basics of Thoul, part 3.

The Nouns:

The base form of Thoul nouns is always just the word itself ~ ex, thal = water.  This base form is used when the noun is singular and the subject of a sentence.

If the singular noun is the object (ie, is the predicate noun, instead of subject), then add an -a to the noun ~ ex, thala = the water.

The singular possessive form is created by adding -i ~ ex, thali = (the) water’s.

Thoul has a fourth conjugation that English does not, to conjugate the direct object ~ ex, egthal = (to/from/of) the water.

The plural forms go thus:

Subject = -a (thala = waters), object = -ia (thalia = the waters), possessive = -is (thalis = the waters’), dative (direct object) = (egthala = to/from/of the waters).

Water:

thal, thala, thali, egthal; thala, thalia, thalis, egthala.

*There are no real exceptions to this noun paradigm*

The Adjectives/Adverbs:

Adjectives append to the noun they are modifying; the adverbs that modify a single word append similarly; adverbs that modify more than one word stand alone, but are placed beside the words they intend to modify.

All modifiers are given the special affix -ya, which appends to the end of the word being modified (in the case of multi-word modifiers, -ya appends to the modifier itself).

The big dog = kif ligarksya.

“Dog-piling”:  In Thoul, if a word is being modified by more than one adjective/adverb these modifiers “dog-pile” onto the word in a chain-like fashion.

The big, old, hairy dog = kif ligiyoliruckearksya.

Note, in the above example, that only the modifier closest to the “dog-piled” word conjugates like a typical modifier (with -ya coming after the word); the modifiers that come before have their -ya appended directly to themselves in the form of -i-.

In the case of stand-alone modifiers…:

We fight as oneryckis ok eya.

The Verbs:

Thoul verbs have two primary paradigms:  The regular verb paradigm; the copulative verb paradigm.

The Regular Verbs:

Infinitive… To feed = ioune, feeding (participle) = uneos, feeding (gerund) = uneas, fed (participle) = unees.

Active… (I) feed = une, (I) fed = uneo, (I) will feed = unei, (if I) feed = unea, (if I) fed = uneou, (if I) will feed = uneia, not feed = iune, not fed = iuneo, will not feed = iunei, if not feed = iunea, if not fed = iuneou, if will not feed = iuneia.

Passive… Is fed = unee, was fed = uneu, shall be fed = unea, (if) is fed = uneae, (if) was fed = uneue, (if) shall be fed = uneie, is not fed = iunee, was not fed = iuneu, shall not be fed = iunea, (if) is not fed = iuneae, (if) was not fed = iuneue, (if) shall not be fed = iuneie.

Causative… To be fed = ioegune, be fed = egune, shall be fed = agune, should be fed = ogune, not to be fed = iomegune, not be fed = eghune, shall not be fed = aghune, should not be fed = oghune.

The Copulative (to be) Verbs:

To be = nio, being (partic.) = nos, being (gerund.) = nas, been (partic.) = nes, to not be = mio.

(I am) = -io, (I was) = -oi, (I will be) = -ei, (I were (is)) = -ia, (I were (was)) = -oa, (I would be) = –ea, (I am not) = –mio, (I was not) = -moi, (I will not) = -mei, (I were (is) not) = -mia, (I were (was) not) = -moa, (I would not) = -mea.

Pass.Pres. = -uo, Pass.Past. = -ui, Pass.Fut. = -ue, Pass.Pres.Subj. = -ua, Pass.Past.Subj. = -uu, Pass.Fut.Subj. = -uo, Pass.Pres.Neg. = -muo, Pass.Past.Neg. = -mui, Pass.Fut.Neg. = -mue, Pass.Pres.Subj.Neg. = -mua, Pass.Past.Subj.Neg. = -muu, Pass.Fut.Subj.Neg. = -muo.

*Copulative verbs have no causative forms*

**Complete list of copulative verbs in Thoul:  nio = to be, vio = must, lio = shall, klio = can, ionei = will, iovei = to have, iolei = to go, ioklei = to do**

Shall:

Shall = iolio, (I) shall = -lio, (I) should (past) = -loi, (I) shall be = -lei, (I) should (subj.) = -lia, -loa, -lea.  Neg. = -ilio, -iloi, -ilei, -ilia, -iloa, -ilea….

Go:

To go = iolei, going (partic.) = leios, going (gerund.) = leias, gone (partic.) = leies.

Active = lei, leio, leie, leia, leiu, leii, ilei, ileio, ileie, ileia, ileiu, ileii.

Passive = leiuo, leiui, leiue, leiua, leiuu, leiuo, leimuo, leimui, leimue, leimua, leimuu, leimuo.

And that wraps up Part 3!  This ain’t finished yet… stay tuned!

 

Work of the Week #22

This week I return to the Pathallea universe, with some grammars for many of the  periphery cultures of the Pathallean island chains – including “Bush,” “Savage,” and “Snowshoe” cultures, to name a few…:

petroglyphs-0

The languages are inspired by such language groups as Bantu, Khoe-San, Australian (aboriginal), and the many Papuan tongues.

^_^

Work of the Week #19

*update*

I moved!  I’m now a Masters student attending Western University (UWO)…

Anyway….

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The “Old Script”

*language/script of the Alka of Pathallea*

Old Script

This is what happens when one makes a language by listening to LIGHTS songs played backwards…:

oldScript03

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Enjoy your first day of school, kids! (if that’s even possible…)

😀

 

Work of the Week #17

It’s about time I made a list of the main races involved in Pathallea…:

Breykara >> Humans (general Thoul term).  They inhabit Breykaria = Orimar + Oramidra + Koie.

Braeokara >> Humans that live in the Oramidra chain.

Alka >> Thoul word for tall, multi-coloured beings that live on the northern half of the Yol Kyire chain.  They are distantly related to the Slenka and Yoleukara.

Slenka/Slenkara >> Slenka, short for Slenkara, are tall, four-armed beings more proximally related to the Yoleukara and who reside on the Ile Kyira chain.

Yoleukara >> four-armed beings residing on the southern half of Yol Kyire (as well as having colonies south of Koie); they’re also the most technologically-advanced.

“Furries” >> Pathallea’s equivalent of the Sasquatch, except shorter and more humanoid in appearance.

Dreybra, Dreykara >> fishing tribesmen living on the southern, unexplored part of Koie.

Seodikara, Sidiyokara >> hunter-gatherer tribesmen living on the Piaromea chain.

“Hybrids” >> Hallie’s kind…  usually born of human fathers and Yoleukaran mothers (such offspring are rare on Pathallea).

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Cheers!  🙂

Work of the Week #12

A little ‘family tree’ exercise, for Pathallea…:

>Hallie (Haalihwa) is the elder of two hybrid girls born to the explorer Nasida, the younger daughter being Hoola (Hoolakwa); their mother was a Yoleukar originally from the southern-most reaches of the Koie island chain.

>The Professor went to university with Nasida, even sharing a couple classes; they were good friends during those years.

>The Professor married after five years of working at the university, siring two sons and a daughter of his own; the eldest of whom would become a carpenter by trade, and have direct influence in the building of his family’s house.

>Thoe, Hallie’s ‘step-sister,’ is the carpenter’s only true child; Hallie was adopted into their home via the Professor when she was four years old.

>The third hybrid of note is Thaak’wa, who is not genetically related to Hallie nor Hoola; she was artificially sired by the Slenka using DNA from a human male and Yoleukaran female (she’s one of five such trials, but the only one to live past childhood).

>Finally, the gynoid Yolua was the product of a runaway Yoleukaran tinkerer; he so happened to have been the husband of the female whose DNA resulted in Thaak’wa (their island was invaded in the night by the Slenka; many were displaced by it).

**I’ll be on a family trip for the coming two weeks, so a “Work of the Week” is likely to be very lacking during that time…